Operation New Hope Looking for Partners for Eastside Community Garden

With Easter right around the corner, this is always a good time of year to think about and help out anyone you can. I received an email from Shakera Bailey, the community organizer with Operation New Hope, a non-profit that works to revitalize and sustain economically and ethnically diverse communities in and around Jacksonville’s urban core.

ONH is looking for groups, business, or agencies of any kind to partner with them in assisting the Eastside Community Garden, which will be located next to A. Phillip Randolph Park on the SW corner of Phelps & Spearing Street.

The full details that I received from her:

Dear Mike,
My name is Shakera Bailey and I am the community organizer with Operation New Hope INC. Operation New Hope, INC. is a not-for-profit 501(c)(3) Community Development Corporation that works to revitalize and sustain economically and ethnically diverse communities in and around Jacksonville’s urban core. We do this by rebuilding communities one house and one life at a time. Operation New Hope has two divisions- ONH Development, which develops new homes for first-time buyers in our targeted neighborhoods; and the Ready4Work Division, which assists the re-entry efforts of ex-offenders who have completed incarceration and wish to find long-term gainful employment in the local community.

Operation New Hope is looking for community agencies and businesses to partner with for the Eastside Community Garden. The garden will be located next to A. Phillip Randolph Park on the SW corner of Phelps & Spearing Street. We are currently in the planning stages and would like your assistance. Operation New Hope has built 66 homes on the Eastside and in Springfield. This has brought 66 hard-working, honest, low to moderate income families into this area. But, as you know there is still so much to be done. Community gardens serve many purposes and have many benefits, some of which include: recreation & exercise, therapy, reducing family food budgets while increasing food security, social interaction, beautification, a sense of community, reducing crime and vandalism, constructive family time alternatives, fresh food and improved nutrition, and joy. The Eastside Community Garden will be one of the pivotal parts of what needs to be done in order to reduce childhood obesity, lower the infant mortality rate, and most importantly bring back a sense of community.

We are requesting you help in getting our garden off the ground due to your passion for gardening. Any and all help would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks In Advance

Shakera T. Bailey

Jacksonville Seed Exchange will be donating seeds to ONH for use at the Eastside Community Garden.

If you can help in any way, or know of anyone who can help out with the garden, whether through donations of funds, time, supplies, or in volunteering, please contact Shakera Bailey at sbailey@OperationNewHope.com, or call 904-354-4673. Please spread the word, and above all, have a Happy Easter.

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~ by Mike on April 10, 2009.

2 Responses to “Operation New Hope Looking for Partners for Eastside Community Garden”

  1. True words, some truthful words dude. Made my day!!

  2. If you are looking for a community garden in NE Florida we can help. You can find Friends of Northeast Florida Community Gardens at http://neflcg.blogspot.com

    Find a listing of the gardens in the “Directory/Maps” page.
    You can contact any of the gardens listed in the “Contact a Community Garden in Your Area” page.

    FNFCG was formed in response to a demand for greater cohesion within the community gardens of Northeast Florida. The number of community gardens in Northeast Florida continues to increase, with gardens being started all over, from schools and churches to private businesses and correctional facilities. The opportunity for community gardens to share resources, apply collectively for funding opportunities and communicate collectively with local government increases the efficiency, resiliency and strength of Northeast Florida’s food system.

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