Hunger Highway Plan, or Freeway Feeding

The National Highway System is approximately 160,000 miles (256,000 kilometers) of roadway important to the nation’s economy, defense, and mobility.

A lot of it is landscaped already and much is concrete or metal barriers. This still leaves a lot of fallow land.

If America were to plant potatoes, maize, rice, and wheat on even 50% of the available land in medians, we would easily be able to feed ourselves. The homeless could be paid stipends to plant, tend, and harvest the food and could keep a portion for themselves.

In Jacksonville, the situation is similar – many acres of grassy area on our roads that could be put to good use.

This project would need sponsors, farmers, nurseries, or seed companies willing to donate the seed to start it, volunteers to organize and plant, proper permissions, and much more, but it would be well worth it.

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~ by Mike on June 18, 2009.

2 Responses to “Hunger Highway Plan, or Freeway Feeding”

  1. I think that your thinking on this one is in the right place, but if you think about it, this is the land that for years had the gas and diesel exhaust (many of those years lead in the gas) deposited on it. It ia also the land that get the drainage from any road deposits any time it rains. Not to mention the pesticides that have been deposited to the road sides over the years. But I do believe that there is still plenty of public lands that could be utilized for the same purpose. Just have the soils tested before you start.

  2. I think this is avery good idea, even if these plants where not good for human cosumption, the plants would help filter out the enviromental problems caused by the highways.

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